Tuesday, April 16, 2013

A lesson in communications

Shortly after he terrorist bombing in Boston yesterday (04.15.13), the "authorities" (likely DHS) temporarily shut down the cell hone networks as a precaution against other bombs being detonated by remote control through the cellular networks.

While I understand the reasoning behind this action, (perhaps they were disarming the other bomb they (reportedly) found). It did, no doubt, cause a great deal of issues for many urban dwellers who have no other form of communication.

Just a thought: If that is the only telecommunications device your friends and family have in order to contact you, or you the rest of the world, you should have a backup plan.

I'm not talking a way to update your Facebook and such (although you could do that at any shop with Wi-Fi), but a plan to check in with your fellows and family in the event that the Cell networks are down. Perhaps Skype using Wi-Fi....perhaps a number you can call from a land line (if you can access one) to make contact with someone.

Just a thought.


Tango said...

The phone companies said DHS did *NOT* shut down cell services, but that they were overloaded with the massive number of calls.

B said...

I heard otherwise from folks who know.

It was an obvious and reasonable precaution.

But it DID happen. For a short time only.

Divemedic said...

This is why I, and every member of my household, has a HAM radio license. The technician test is 35 basic questions on electronics and radio communications, and no morse code is required. It only costs $15.
Once you pass that test, you can use handheld radios that allow you to communicate using repeaters, or direct radio to radio communications. The radios can be had for as little as $40, and have much more power and range than the FMRS radios.
The repeaters are less crowded, and less likely to be shut down in an emergency than cell towers or FMRS. It gives us a lot of flexibility in our communication plan.